Ancient Greek woolworker's thigh- and knee-guards. They take the form of a thick terracotta half-cylinder open at one end and closed at the other, the closed end corresponding to the knee. Their precise use is uncertain, but at some point in the woolmaking process after carding and perhaps before spinning, the fibers were rubbed across the top of an epinetron, which was roughened by an incised pattern.

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Go Historic ID
31417

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Refers to ancient Greek woolworker's thigh- and knee-guards. They take the form of a thick terracotta half-cylinder open at one end and closed at the other, the closed end corresponding to the knee. Their precise use is uncertain, but at some point in the woolmaking process after carding and perhaps before spinning, the fibers were rubbed across the top of an epinetron, which was roughened by an incised pattern. The knee end was occasionally decorated with a moldmade female head, appropriate since weaving and woolworking were done by women. Some of the figured and more elaborately painted epinetra were probably given as wedding presents to young women. Although the term onos is often used synonymously with epinetron, an onos was the woolworker's footrest.

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  1. 1.   Overview of Epinetra  ← you are here
  2. 2.   Sources for Epinetra (1)

Page Info

Title
Epinetra
Date Published
December 12, 2012
Last Updated
April 22, 2021