Shinto

Used to distinguish the indigenous Japanese religious beliefs and practices from Buddhism, which had been introduced into Japan in the sixth century. In general, it is characterized by its lack of official sacred scripture and specific formal dogma and by the veneration of small images set in particular Shinto shrines.

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Go Historic ID
8942
Names
Shinto
Shintoism
shintoïsme Dutch
Sintoísmo Spanish
sintoísta Spanish
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The indigenous Japanese religious beliefs and practices as distinguished from Buddhism, which had been introduced into Japan in the sixth century. In general, it is characterized by its lack of official sacred scripture and specific formal dogma and by the veneration of small images set in particular Shinto shrines. The religious system is categorized into three interconnected sects: Shrine Shinto (Jinja Shinto), which constitutes the main currents of Shinto tradition; State Shinto (Kokka Shinto), based on the unification of religion and state and practiced by the Japanese Imperial family; and Sect Shinto (Kyoha Shinto), a movement consisting of sects that originated in Japan around the 19th century and after World War II, each organized by a founder into religious associations in which members are known as parishioners (ujiko) of a particular shrine.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300022082. The J. Paul Getty Trust.