International Gothic

Style that developed in the French and Burgundian courts in the mid-14th century and spread widely over western Europe by about 1425. The style is primarily manifested in non-monumental art, including panel paintings, miniatures, illuminated manuscripts, enamels, embroideries, and stained glass. The style is characterized by fluid elegance, curvilinear refinement, a supple, elongated human form, playfulness, and a new interest in secular themes.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
8514
Names
International Gothic
Gothic, International
International Style
Soft Style
Weicher Stil
internationale gotiek Dutch
Gótico internacional Spanish
Parent Topics

More Definitions

Refers to the style that developed in the French and Burgundian courts in the mid-14th century and spread widely over western Europe by about 1425. The style is primarily manifested in non-monumental art, including panel paintings, miniatures, illuminated manuscripts, enamels, embroideries, and stained glass. The style is characterized by fluid elegance, curvilinear refinement, a supple, elongated human form, playfulness, and a new interest in secular themes. Some scholars object to use of the term, feeling it is too all-encompassing and therefore meaningless or even derogatory.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300020786. The J. Paul Getty Trust.