Truss Bridges

Bridges that employ trusses, which are structural members comprising straight pieces of metal or timber forming a series of triangles lying in a single plane, thus making the structure unlikely to be distorted by stress. Wooden truss bridges, in the form of covered bridges, were common in the United States from the 1870s to the 1930s; carefully fitted timbers were combined with iron rods for tension.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
388
Names
truss bridge
truss bridges
bridges, truss
vakwerkbruggen Dutch
vakwerkbrug Dutch
puentes de celosía Spanish
puente de celosía Spanish
Child Topics

More Definitions

Bridges that employ trusses, which are structural members comprising straight pieces of metal or timber forming a series of triangles lying in a single plane, thus making the structure unlikely to be distorted by stress. Wooden truss bridges, in the form of covered bridges, were common in the United States from the 1870s to the 1930s; carefully fitted timbers were combined with iron rods for tension. Later, railroad bridges and other bridges were constructed of cast iron and wrought iron, which were eventually succeeded by steel in truss bridges.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300007870. The J. Paul Getty Trust.