Jehovah's Witnesses

Christian sect originally founded by Charles Taze Russell in the late 19th century. Russell's successor, Joseph Franklin Rutherford, adopted the name Jehovah's Witness in 1931. The sect believes that Jehovah (Yahweh) is the true God, and that Jesus Christ is the son of God. The sect's goal is to establish what they consider to be God's Kingdom, which they believe will emerge following an apocalyptic Armageddon.

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Go Historic ID
32154
Names
Jehovah's Witnesses
Jehovah's Witness
Jehova's getuigen Dutch
Testigos de Jehov√° Spanish
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Christian sect originally founded by Charles Taze Russell in the late 19th century. Russell's successor, Joseph Franklin Rutherford, adopted the name Jehovah's Witness in 1931. The sect believes that Jehovah (Yahweh) is the true God, and that Jesus Christ is the son of God. The sect's goal is to establish what they consider to be God's Kingdom, which they believe will emerge following an apocalyptic Armageddon. Generally, Jehovah's Witnesses have no association with other denominations, and shun secular governments. They do not vote, celebrate religious or national holidays, and members refuse military service. Members engage in door-to-door proselytizing, selling their publications, "The Watchtower" and "Awake!", which is published in 80 languages.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300265857. The J. Paul Getty Trust.