Jōdo Shinshū

Largest school of Japanese Buddhism. It was founded by Shinran (1173-1262) and organized by Rennyo (1414-1499) and is based on simple yet exclusive devotion to Amida. Shinran, a disciple of Honen, was more radical than his teacher. Shinran believed that since Amida's grace is relevant to a good person, it was even more so to a sinner.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
30957
Names
Jōdo Shinshū
Shin-shu
True Pure Land School
True Pure Land sect
Shin
Pure Land sect
True Pure Land

More Definitions

Refers to the largest school of Japanese Buddhism. It was founded by Shinran (1173-1262) and organized by Rennyo (1414-1499) and is based on simple yet exclusive devotion to Amida. Shinran, a disciple of Honen, was more radical than his teacher. Shinran believed that since Amida's grace is relevant to a good person, it was even more so to a sinner. Reliance on Amida is all that is needed for liberation. Only one sincere recitation of the 'nembutsu' is needed to be reborn in Amida's Pure Land. The nembutsu is seen as an act of gratitude rather than one of supplicating trust. This and other aspects of Jodo Shinshu (e.g. it is a lay movement with no monks or monasteries) made it extremely popular. The school split into two factions in the 17th century, the Ōtani and Honganji. Both factions remains powerful and popular today and have their main temples in Kyoto.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300264460. The J. Paul Getty Trust.