Shavuot

A Jewish holiday observed on 6 Sivan (May or June) to commemorate God's giving of the Law to Moses on Mount Sinai. Second of the three Jewish pilgrim festivals, it falls fifty days after the first day of Passover and originally marked the end of the barley harvest and the beginning of the wheat harvest. The traditional agricultural aspect of the festival is reflected in the continuing custom of decorating synagogues with flowers, green plants, and fruits.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
30951
Names
Shavuot Hebrew (transliterated)
Feast of Weeks
Pentecost
Shabuot
Shabuoth
Shavu'ot
Shavuoth
Hag Shavuot
Ḥag Shaḇuot
Hag Ha-Shavuot
Yom ha-Biqqurim
Yom haBikkurim
Hag Habikurim
Yom ha-Bikkurim
Hag Matan Torah
Ḥag haKatzir
Hag ha-Qazir
Ḥag ha-Qatsir
Atzeret
Zeman Matan Toratenu
Day of the First Fruits
Day of Firstfruits
Festival of Reaping
Festival of First Fruits
Feast of the Harvest
Season of the Giving of Our Torah
Feast of the Giving of the Law
Sjavoeot Dutch

More Definitions

A Jewish holiday observed on 6 Sivan (May or June) to commemorate God's giving of the Law to Moses on Mount Sinai. Second of the three Jewish pilgrim festivals, it falls fifty days after the first day of Passover and originally marked the end of the barley harvest and the beginning of the wheat harvest. The traditional agricultural aspect of the festival is reflected in the continuing custom of decorating synagogues with flowers, green plants, and fruits. In the Middle Ages, children first attended Hebrew school on this day; in modern times, confirmation often occurs on Shavuot. Customary readings include the Book of Ruth and the Ten Commandments. Dairy products are traditionally consumed on Shavuot because Song of Songs compares the Torah with milk.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300264445. The J. Paul Getty Trust.