Ahmadiyya

An Islamic religious movement founded in India in 1889 by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (ca. 1839-1908). Ghulam Ahmad claimed to be the Messiah Mahdi prophesied in the Koran, the Christian Messiah, an incarnation of the Hindu god Krishna, and a reappearance of Muhammad. In 1914 the sect split into two very separate branches, the Qadiyani and Lahori.

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30843
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Ahmadiyya Spanish
Ahmadiyah
Aḥmadiyyah
Ahmadis
Aḥmadīya
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Refers to an Islamic religious movement founded in India in 1889 by Mirza Ghulam Ahmad (ca. 1839-1908). Ghulam Ahmad claimed to be the Messiah Mahdi prophesied in the Koran, the Christian Messiah, an incarnation of the Hindu god Krishna, and a reappearance of Muhammad. In 1914 the sect split into two very separate branches, the Qadiyani and Lahori. Ahmadiyya is rejected by orthodox Muslims because Ghulam Ahmad's claim to be a prophet following Muhammad cannot coexist with the traditional belief that Muhammad was the last manifestation of God. Other unorthodox beliefs are that Jesus feigned death and actually escaped to India, where he died at the age of 120, and that the concept of jihad (holy war) can be reinterpreted as a peaceful instead of violent battle against unbelievers. After many years of demonstrations against the sect, its followers were declared heretical in 1974 and were officially banned from the orthodox Islamic community. The movement is noted for its missionary zeal and is active in Asia, Africa, and Europe.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300264306. The J. Paul Getty Trust.