Chen-Yen

School of Tantric Buddhism in China. Its name is derived from the Indian Sanskrit word "mantra" meaning 'mystical world.The work of Shubhakarasimha brought about Chen-Yen in China in 716 CE and it was expanded by others such as Amoghavajra (705-774). Although it gained imperial favor for a time, it never became extremely popular in China.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
19505
Names
Chen-Yen
Chen Yen
Mi Tsung
True Word school
True Word sect
Chinese Esoteric Buddhism
Tsjen-Jen Dutch

More Definitions

School of Tantric Buddhism in China. Its name is derived from the Indian Sanskrit word "mantra" meaning 'mystical world.The work of Shubhakarasimha brought about Chen-Yen in China in 716 CE and it was expanded by others such as Amoghavajra (705-774). Although it gained imperial favor for a time, it never became extremely popular in China. Instead, it flourished in Japan after Kukai brought back some Chen-Yen rituals and texts after his 804 trip to China; Kukai was responsible for founding the Shingon school of Chen-Yen in his native Japan. Chen-Yen received an infusion of life from Tibet during the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368) but the surviving school is as much Tibetan as it is Chinese and the intrinsic quality of Chen-Yen has declined.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300157309. The J. Paul Getty Trust.