Basilian

Several Christian monastic communities of the Byzantine Rite that follow the rule of St. Basil, their spiritual father; there are five major branches of the Order of St. Basil. The Basilian monastic community has been highly influential in the Byzantine community over the centuries, comparable to the Benedictine influence within the Western monastic community.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
19328
Names
Basilian
Order of Saint Basil
Order of St. Basil
basiliaan Dutch
Basilio Spanish

More Definitions

Refers to several Christian monastic communities of the Byzantine Rite that follow the rule of St. Basil, their spiritual father; there are five major branches of the Order of St. Basil. The Basilian monastic community has been highly influential in the Byzantine community over the centuries, comparable to the Benedictine influence within the Western monastic community. St. Basil, theologian and archbishop of Caesarea in Cappadocia (modern Turkey), created his monastic rule between 358 and 364. St. Basil's simple yet strict rule asks followers to practice community living and advocates ascetic practices as a way to serve God more perfectly. His rule avoids the extreme asceticism of the desert hermits. Implied by St. Basil are vows of chastity and poverty, anticipating the later Western monastic systems, and aid to the poor is also called for. Attached to the monasteries should be schools for children in which the students can be tested for a possible religious vocation. St. Basil's rule was revised in the 9th century by St. Theodore of Studios. The Basilian order should not be confused with a Latin-rite congregation of the same name that was founded in France in 1822 but later active mainly in Canada; the members of this congregation devote themselves to educating children.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300148037. The J. Paul Getty Trust.