Yom Kippur

The most important and solemn holiday in the Jewish liturgical calendar, observed on 10 Tishri (September or October). This day, which concludes the "ten days of repentance" that begin with Rosh Hoshanah, is a day of atonement and reconciliation with God. Jews must abstain from food, drink, and sex and all work must cease.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
16095
Names
Yom Kippur Hebrew (transliterated)
Atonement, Day of
Day of Atonement
Shabbat Shabbaton
Grote Verzoendag Dutch
Yom ha-Kippurim Hebrew (transliterated)
Yom Kijopurim Spanish
fiesta del Gran Perdón Spanish
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More Definitions

The most important and solemn holiday in the Jewish liturgical calendar, observed on 10 Tishri (September or October). This day, which concludes the "ten days of repentance" that begin with Rosh Hoshanah, is a day of atonement and reconciliation with God. Jews must abstain from food, drink, and sex and all work must cease. In the Bible, Yom Kippur is referred to as "Shabbat Shabbaton," meaning "Sabbath of Solemn Rest" or "Sabbath of Sabbaths." Extremely Orthodox Jews may wear long white robes called kippelot and may forbid the wearing of leather and the anointing with oil. The evening before and the entire day of Yom Kippur are spent in prayer and meditation. Asking for and obtaining forgiveness from others signifies the forgiveness of God. Yom Kippur services are concluded with closing prayers and the blowing of the shofar. Before the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem, the high priest performed an elaborate sacrificial ceremony that ended with a goat (the scapegoat) being driven into the wilderness, symbolically carrying the sins of Israel.

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Bibliography

  1. 1.  The Getty Art & Architecture Thesaurus, 300069626. The J. Paul Getty Trust.