Grosvenor House

Alternatively known as: Grosvenor House, BENNETTS HILL Office building, with ground-floor bank and shops. 1953-4 by Cotton, Ballard and Blow for Jack Cotton, the Birmingham-born entrepreneur. Reinforced concrete frame, clad in artificial stone panels to front; the rear elevation has the frame exposed with brick infi1l.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
546953
Names
Grosvenor House
Coordinates
52.4794830° N, 1.9004670° W
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Listed on
Grade II listed building
listed building (England)

Location Map

Aerial view of Grosvenor House
Location map of Grosvenor House. Click image for a larger, interactive view.

Aerial View

Aerial view of Grosvenor House
Aerial view of Grosvenor House. Click image for a larger, interactive view.

Timeline

18 Feb 1999

Grosvenor House designated a Grade II listed building

National Heritage List for England Data

Grosvenor House is listed on the National Heritage List for England with the following data. Some information may have become outdated since the date of listing. Text courtesy of Historic England. © Crown Copyright, reprinted under the Open Government License.

List Entry ID
1245547
Grade
II
Name
GROSVENOR HOUSE
Location
GROSVENOR HOUSE, 54-57, NEW STREET
District
Birmingham
Grid Reference
SP 06856 86844

SP 0686 NE BIRMINGHAM NEW STREET (north side) 33/10198 Numbers 54-57 (Consecutive) Grosvenor House GV II

Alternatively known as: Grosvenor House, BENNETTS HILL Office building, with ground-floor bank and shops. 1953-4 by Cotton, Ballard and Blow for Jack Cotton, the Birmingham-born entrepreneur. Reinforced concrete frame, clad in artificial stone panels to front; the rear elevation has the frame exposed with brick infi1l. Roof concealed behind projecting parapet and 'flying' concrete and glass cornice that is a principal feature of the building. Eight storeys on corner site, with office suites entered from Bennett's Hill. Strongly rhythmic facade to New Street, elements of which are repeated on the Bennett's Hill facade. Curved 'prow' of building at corner, with small balconies protected by thin, curved steel balustrading to French windows. Curved windows to left of this, then seven angled bays giving a zig-zag rhythm, ending in another curve, all with pivoted steel windows. Concave return to west. Deep projecting sill band repeats the undulating pattern over each storey, and heavily moulded cornice surmounting them forms a straight capping. Extra projecting sills to central windows of upper storeys. Similar triangular sills form an alternating pattern to the otherwise flat Bennett's Hill elevation, producing a building with a syncopation appropriate to its era, and with a consistency and flair not found on other speculative buildings in England at the time. The ground-floor shop fronts behind the broad canopy (itself, however, an important feature) and the interiors have been remodelled and are not of special interest...

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Bibliography

  1. “GROSVENOR HOUSE.” The National Heritage List for England. Web. Accessed 8 Oct. 2013. <https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1245547>