Old Ursuline Convent New Orleans, Louisiana

The Old Ursuline Convent in New Orleans is the finest surviving example of French colonial public architecture in the country. Louis XV in style, formal and symetrical, with restrained ornament, the convent was constructed between 1748 and 1752 for Ursuline nuns, whose mission was to nurse the poor and teach young girls.

Old Ursuline Convent, New Orleans
Margaret Nissen

Facts & Stats

Id
248879
Best Known As
Old Ursuline Convent
Full Name
Old Ursuline Convent
Also Known As
Archbishop Antoine Blanc Memorial Complex
Convent of the Sisters of Ursula
Coordinates
29.960744° N, 90.060430° W  (map)

Contact Info

Address
1100 Chartres St.
70116
Phone
504-529-2651
Website
tps.cr.nps.gov

Timeline

National Historic Landmark Description

Statement of Significance (as of designation - October 9, 1960) This is the finest surviving example of French colonial public architecture in the country. Louis XV in style, formal and symetrical, with restrained ornament. It was constructed between 1748 and 1752 for nuns whose mission was to nurse the poor and teach young girls.

Condition Hurricane Katrina blew down a chimney that damaged the roof, which activated fire sprinklers that caused extensive interior water damage, all of which has now been repaired. The NHL is in good condition.

The Convent was re-roofed after Hurricane Karina, the walls on the interior were repaired, and the shutters and broken windows replaced.

Further Resources

  1. Ursuline Convent. National Historic Landmarks Database. Official source.
  2. Official Website of Old Ursuline Convent. Official source.