Gloucester Cathedral

Gloucester Cathedral

Founded in 1100 as a Norman abbey, Gloucester Cathedral boasts a huge medieval stained glass window, an elegant interior and one of the finest cloisters in the country. Here William I ordered the Domesday Book and scenes from the Harry Potter movies were filmed.

Quick Facts

Go Historic ID
248475
Names
Cathedral Church of the Holy and Indivisible Trinity
Gloucester Cathedral
Coordinates
51.8675000° N, 2.2466670° W
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Affiliations

Location Map

Aerial view of Gloucester Cathedral
Location map of Gloucester Cathedral. Click image for a larger, interactive view.

Aerial View

Aerial view of Gloucester Cathedral
Aerial view of Gloucester Cathedral. Click image for a larger, interactive view.

Timeline

681

Abbey of St. Peter founded in Gloucester by Saxon king Osric

Dec 1085

William the Conqueror orders the Domesday Book at Gloucester

1122

Gloucester abbey church is destroyed by fire

1216

Henry III crowned at Gloucester Abbey

Dec 1327

King Edward II buried in Gloucester Abbey; tomb attracts pilgrims

1351

First fully-developed fan vaulting appears in Gloucester Cathedral cloisters

1555

Anglican Bishop of Gloucester burned at the stake

23 Jan 1952

Gloucester Cathedral designated a Grade I listed building

National Heritage List for England Data

Gloucester Cathedral is listed on the National Heritage List for England with the following data. Some information may have become outdated since the date of listing. Text courtesy of Historic England. © Crown Copyright, reprinted under the Open Government License.

List Entry ID
1245952
Grade
I
Name
CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF THE HOLY AND INDIVISIBLE TRINITY
Location
CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF THE HOLY AND INDIVISIBLE TRINITY, CATHEDRAL PRECINCTS
District
Gloucester
County
Gloucestershire
Grid Reference
SO 83121 18778

GLOUCESTER

SO8318NW CATHEDRAL PRECINCTS 844-1/8/42 Cathedral Church of the Holy and 23/01/52 Indivisible Trinity

GV I

Cathedral church. Formerly the conventual church of the Benedictine Abbey of St Peter on or near the site of a monastery founded by Osric c681. After the dissolution of the monastery the church refounded 1541 as a secular cathedral. Includes major portions of the Romanesque church built 1089-1100 for Abbot Serlo, the nave completed 1104-22, the timber roof of nave replaced by vault completed 1242; south aisle of nave rebuilt in Decorated style 1319-29; south transept remodelled with innovative use of Perpendicular details 1331-6; presbytery remodelled in developed Perpendicular style 1337-67, followed by the north transept 1368-73; the two west bays of nave and west front rebuilt and the south porch added c1420; central tower rebuilt c1450; Lady Chapel rebuilt late C15. Major repairs for Bishop Benson 1734-52; restorations by FW Waller 1847-63, Sir Gilbert Scott 1866-73, and FW Waller 1873-90, JL Pearson consultant for restoration of Lady Chapel 1896-7, C20 repairs. MATERIALS: limestone ashlar and squared coursed rubble, lead and stone slate roofs. PLAN: cruciform, with tall central tower above crossing; aisled nave of nine bays, the principal entrance through a large, two storey porch projecting from the second bay of the south aisle of the nave; the choir, entered through pulpitum occupies the east bay of the nave and the crossing; north and south transepts each of two bays with a two storey, polygonal chapel projecting from the east side of each of the outer bays; ambulatory around presbytery of five bays with the east bay canted outwards to accommodate the greater width of the C14 great east window which replaced the C12 apse (evidence of early Romanesque pier left visible in the second pier from the NE corner at Tribune level); apsidal ambulatory with north-east and south east, two storey, radiating chapels with polygonal apses, the upper chapels entered from the tribune galleries above the aisles...

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Bibliography

  1. “CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF THE HOLY AND INDIVISIBLE TRINITY.” The National Heritage List for England. Web. Accessed 8 Oct. 2013. <https://historicengland.org.uk/listing/the-list/list-entry/1245952>